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 Polish Sejm speaker warns Ukraine against adoption of genocide resolution

Polish Senate Speaker Stanisław Karczewski has opposed Verkhovna Rada's recognition of genocide against Ukrainians by Polish authorities in 1919-1951.

Censor.NET reports citing Polskie Radio.

Karczewski remarked that the adoption of a draft resolution on commemoration of the victims of genocide against Ukrainians by the Polish government in 1919-1951 may have negative effects.

As previously reported, the corresponding draft resolution was submitted to the Verkhovna Rada by independent people's deputy Oleh Musii.

Karczewski said that only a dialogue can bring hope for understanding common history with Ukrainians. The speaker added that Poland has to tell the truth about the Volyn tragedy and the adoption of the relevant resolution by the Polish parliament was a testament to this.

According to the politician, the senate has made a bold and decisive step, for what Ukrainians did can be called nothing but genocide.

Read more: Ambassador Deshchytsia on Volyn tragedy recognition as genocide by Polish Sejm: "I guess we have recrimination period ahead"

He believes there is a favorable atmosphere in Poland for searching the historical truth.

Additionally, Karczewski noted that meetings with Ukrainian politicians have shown that even though they do not want to talk openly about the Volyn tragedy, relations between Warsaw and Kyiv are amicable. The senator also expressed hope that understanding could finally be reached in this issue.

Earlier, July 22, the Polish parliament (Sejm) declared July 11 Day of remembrance of those who fell victim to 'the genocide' committed by OUN-UPA, SS Galicia and other Ukrainian nationalist organizations against citizens of the Second Republic of Poland in 1943-1945.

The document names Poles, Jews, Armenians, Czechs and other peoples victims of the tragedy, "including some Ukrainians that were trying to help the victims."

As reported, Ukraine and Poland have disagreements over the tragic events in Volyn and Eastern Galicia in 1943-1944. In late 1990s, a joint commission of Polish and Ukrainian historians was set up to study the events. The commission revealed the presence of obvious discrepancies in the interpretation of the events by certain Polish and Ukrainian historians. Ukrainian researchers note that the Volyn tragedy was a consequence of the war between the Armia Krajowa (Poland's Home Army) and the UPA (Ukrainian Insurgent Army), where civilian population was also involved. Apart from this, the Polish side is said to have also resorted to repression against Ukrainian civilians, with the number of victims ranging between 10,000 and 20,000 persons.
 
 
 
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