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 FBI to provide first results of examinations in murder of Sheremet on July 25, - Lutsenko

Experts from the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation will provide first data on the examinations under the case of murder of journalist Pavel Sheremet on July 25.

Prosecutor General Yurii Lutsenko said to 112 TV Channel, Censor.NET reports citing Radio Svoboda.

"On Monday, we plan to listen to the first data from the FBI, who are engaged as experts in the vehicle and explosives examinations," he said.

"They help us analyze the surveillance videos. I think that on Monday we will attract more new investigators both from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the PGO," he added.

He also said that former deputy chief of the National Police Vasyl Paskal might be included in the investigation of Sheremet's murder.

Earlier, Interior Minister Arsen Avakov took the resignation of the first deputy head of the National Police Vasyl Pascal on Nov. 30, 2015. Paskal resigned after public anger arose when he was appointed to the position.

Read more: Investigators follow up six versions in Sheremet's killing, - Tandit

As reported, prominent journalist Pavel Sheremet was killed in a car bombing in downtown Kyiv on Wednesday morning, July 20. The incident is preliminary qualified as murder. National Police chief Khatia Dekanoidze said the investigation into the killing of Sheremet would be a matter of honor for her. Kyiv prosecutor Hovda took the probe under personal control. The Information Policy Ministry is set to establish an inter-agency working group to investigate the death of Sheremet. Investigators follow up six versions in Sheremet's killing.

According to witnesses, the explosion occurred when Sheremet stopped at an exit to a main road. They note high detonation velocity.

The U.S. Embassy in Ukraine expects a thorough investigation into the death of Ukrainska Pravda journalist Pavel Sheremet and extends condolences to his family, friends, and colleagues.

Prosecutor General Lutsenko commented on the tragedy: "The death of Sheremet was due to an explosive device. It's a murder." Later, the Interior Ministry added a homemade shell-less explosive device was used, its power equivalent to 600 grams of TNT.

See more: Last respect paid to journalist Sheremet in Minsk. PHOTOS

Originally from Minsk, Sheremet was particularly critical of Belarusian president Alexander Lukashenko's crackdown on dissent.

In 1997, the journalist was arrested while reporting about smuggling across the Belarus-Lithuanian border and sentenced to two years in prison - a move widely viewed as politically motivated. Amnesty International declared him prisoner of conscience.

In 1999, Sheremet was presented with the Committee to Protect Journalists' International Press Freedom Award. In 2002, he was presented with the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe's Prize for Journalism and Democracy.

Over the past five years, Sheremet has lived in Kyiv, worked for Ukrainska Pravda and was a host at Vesti radio.

 
 
 
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