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 Russia's military prosecution refused to inspect deaths of 159 soldiers

The Chief Military Prosecutor's Office of the Russian Federation, being in charge of the criminal cases involving the deaths of 159 soldiers in the period from Jan. 1, 2014 to July 30, 2015, has not found any violations of the law, confirming the legality of the decisions made.

This is stated in a response by Maxim Toporikov, prosecution representative, to Sergey Krivenko, the chairman of the Commission on Civil-Military Relations at the President's Human Rights Council, Censor.NET reports citing RBC.

"The circumstances of the death of the Russian servicemen listed in your address have been verified pursuant to the criminal procedure law. The military prosecution supervises that the laws be abode during inspections and criminal investigations. The legality of taken decisions has been verified. There are no grounds for their abolition," Toporikov's answer notes.

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The prosecutors also stressed they had not revealed any violations of rights of the families of the fallen soldiers.

In December, Krivenko asked the Investigation Committee and the Chief Military Prosecutor's Office to verify the information about the death of 159 Russian military in the period from Jan. 1, 2014 to July 30, 2015. He also provided the list of names of the deceased, indicating their military units - data gathered during Krivenko's independent investigation. Among them, there are 98 soldiers whose death was not reported to have been investigated by any state agencies. Mostly, such cases relate to the period between August-September 2014.

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In an interview with RBC, Krivenko called an "anomaly" the situation with the hike in military casualties exactly in the second half of 2014. "During these six months, the Russian army lost at least 108 servicemen (68 percent of the total number in one and a half years). In most cases (80 percent) there was no clear information about the circumstances of death and proper investigation by military prosecutors."
 
 
 
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