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 Putin shocked by events in Armenia, - The Wall Street Journal

Russian-media reactions suggest the Kremlin is nervous, as Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan is a close Moscow ally.

Censor.NET reports citing the article by the Wall Street Journal

Ten thousand protesters over the weekend poured into the streets of Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, defying the government's crackdown. Russian-media reactions suggest the Kremlin is nervous, as Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan is a close Moscow ally.

The so-called Electric Yerevan protests erupted this month after the state utilities commission announced a 17% rise in electricity rates, and they have steadily grown. At issue isn't merely the electricity price-hike in a country with 17% unemployment but the Russian domination of the local economy and the corruption and cronyism that are hallmarks of the Kremlin business model.

The local electricity provider, the Armenian Electricity Network, is a subsidiary of Russia's Inter RAO, whose chairman, Igor Sechin, is a close friend of President Vladimir Putin. The protesters allege the company is corrupt, and on Saturday Mr. Sargsyan conceded their demand for an audit. He also suspended the price hike, which was set to begin in August, until the audit is complete.

Read more: Kremlin fears revolution in Armenia, - Bloomberg

The Armenian leader and his Russian patrons seem to have grasped the depth of national feeling. The Kremlin over the weekend lent $200 million in military aid to Armenia, which has a long-standing territorial dispute with neighboring Azerbaijan. Moscow also agreed to move the trial of a Russian soldier suspected of murdering an Armenian family in January to an Armenian court.

At stake for Mr. Putin are his military investments in Armenia. Home to some 3,000 troops, the 102nd Military Base in Gyumri, Armenia, is a crucial Russian beachhead in the South Caucasus corridor, without which Moscow can't control the Caspian Sea and Central Asia. Mr. Putin considers the Caucasus part of Russia's imperial domain, and the Kremlin carved out bits of sovereign territory in the region in its 2008 assault on Georgia. Mr. Putin also wants stability in his Eurasian Economic Union, which Armenia joined this year.

The U.S. and Europe should aim to deny further Russian encroachments by encouraging westward steps. But no such determination is in evidence. The European Union last month diluted its commitment to the Eastern Partnership countries, which include the South Caucasus states of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia. By denying such states a clear path to association, Europe pushes them into Mr. Putin's sphere.

The U.S., meanwhile, took a stance on Twitter. "Concerned by tense situation downtown," the U.S. Embassy in Yerevan tweeted over the weekend. "Urge all sides to display peaceful, restrained behavior befitting democratic values." That's nice.

Watch more: Yerevan police disperses protesters, detaining 237 people. VIDEO

 
 
 
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